Luiz Carlos Trabuco Continues Leading Bradesco To Glory

Throughout much of the history of Latin America, the monopoly has played a dualistic and outsize role that makes it as much an integral part of the modern social and political landscape as, perhaps, any other institution.

While most people in highly developed countries reflexively view monopolies as a net social cost, throughout the developing world of Latin America, their role has been far more ambiguous. In countries where there still is not modern, basic infrastructure throughout much of the territory, monopolies have played a role in bringing primitive and benighted people’s out of the darkness of pre-industrial living conditions and into the modern era according to economia.estadao.com.br.

There certainly is no final verdict on the whether or not the Latin American monopoly has been a net benefit or cost to the societies in which it was installed, and it would be foolish to proclaim that all the good things that modernity has brought to the region more than offset the terrible price that was, at times, exacted on the local population. But there can be no doubt that, at least in certain instances, monopolistic enterprise provided the fastest way forwards for peoples and countries that were hopelessly mired in darkness and savagery.

Examples include the United Fruit Company, which brought widespread economic prosperity throughout much of deeply impoverished Central America, while also bringing methods of sustainable farming to the region. International Telephone and Telegraph is an example of a company that brought first-world communications infrastructure to much of South America, at a time when the majority of its residents throughout Peru, Colombia and Venezuela had never even used a telephone. Telmex is another example of a communications firm with an iron grip monopoly over its markets that, nevertheless, was able to spread modern communications infrastructure to the extent that, today, Mexico frequently ranks as having some of the best internet service anywhere in the world.

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Is Luiz Carlos Trabuco seeking to make Bradesco a Monopoly

So when we turn to the case of Bradesco, the largest bank in Brazil, we cannot be so quick to dismiss as an automatic net negative the apparent aspirations of Luiz Carlos Trabuco as CEO to turn his bank, Bradesco, into the unquestioned monopoly of the Brazilian banking space.

Already, it is clear that Bradesco has done a great deal of good for the state of Sao Paulo and the country as a whole. Through its intense campaigns to raise technological awareness and its rollout of some of the most innovative internet banking platforms in all of Latin America, Bradesco has brought more than half of its 27 million clients online. This is a remarkable achievement for a company operating in a country that, just a decade ago, was populated by a population of which more than three quarters barely knew how to use a computer.

Bradesco has also been able to drive down the prices of banking services throughout its many markets. This has especially been true since it began its concerted effort to undermine the market share of chief rival Itau Unibanco. Seeking to undercut Itau Unicanco in all of its markets, Bradesco has been following a Rockefeller-like strategy of running everyone who it cannot buy out of business.

Whether or not this proves to be a successful strategy in the long run has yet to be seen. However, Trabuco has proven himself to be a formidable businessman, turning nearly everything he has touched throughout his career to pure gold. If he can pull off making Bradesco the number-one, uncontested champion of the Brazilian banking market, the prize could be the largest ever reaped by a Latin American financial institution.

Learn more about Luiz Carlos Trabuco: http://www.infomoney.com.br/blogs/bolsa/o-investidor-de-sucesso/post/7002925/quem-substituira-trabuco-comando-bradesco-nomes-estao-cotados-tudo-pode

Sweetgreen Founder Nathaniel Ru Takes Brand Nationwide

Savvy fast food diners in the northeast will have noticed a sprinkling of high end salad restaurants in their neck of the woods. These restaurants are called Sweetgreen and they’ve been steadily gaining steam over much of the last ten years as their young trio of CEOs, led by Nathaniel Ru, continue to innovate within a classic marketplace.

Right now people are looking for ways to get more out of their fast food dining. Nobody wants to be content with greasy sandwiches and faceless corporations rolling into town. Nathaniel Ru and his team are trying something different. They are trying to do things the Sweetgreen way.

Sweetgreen was established in 2007 right off of campus of Georgetown University. Nathaniel Ru, Nicolas Jammet and Jonathan Nemen are the three that conspired to create the company while attending school together at Georgetown.

They were taking an entrepreneurial class together when they started to dream up the idea of taking the fast food model and shifting it toward healthy alternatives.

Their initial idea was to create a salad chain called ‘Greens’. This quickly morphed into Sweetgreen after a chance meeting with a property owner that gave them the opportunity to open up their first location on M Street in downtown Washington D.C. From there on out everything has been moving at a rocket pace and the company continues to change the way things are done.

The reason that Nathaniel Ru and his team approached a salad chain as their idea was simple and obvious. They wanted healthier eating options while out and about during school. More than that they also wanted to introduce people to the concept of a community oriented eating experience.

Sweetgreen doesn’t just pop up into a community and start taking cash, it ingratiates itself to the area and throws events and such to feel like it belongs. Ru has always wanted Sweetgreen to be part of the public zeitgeist, an extension of the community.

Not only does Sweetgreen make an impact on their community, they also have been shifting how people approach eating out by embracing the technological side of things. Sweetgreen to date gets about 30% of their orders from their website or via their mobile app.

The company is dramatically shifting how they approach business and departing from the way that other contemporary rivals are approaching the same thing. With ten years behind them it is looking like Sweetgreen has another ten years of explosive growth ahead.

Learn more about Nathaniel Ru:

Nathaniel Ru, Jonathan Neman and Nicolas Jammet